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Unleashing the Power Of Culture and Values In Grad School

By Tom Seest

Can Culture and Values Help You Succeed In Grad School?

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Students enrolled at most institutions of higher education have until the add/drop deadline to withdraw from classes they don’t want, with any consequences that this decision might have for their GPA or graduate school application process. While a W isn’t calculated into your college GPA score, it could affect applications.

Can Culture and Values Help You Succeed In Grad School?

Can Culture and Values Help You Succeed In Grad School?

What impact does culture have on graduate school success?

Culture refers to the beliefs and practices that define one society from another. Additionally, culture refers to those who share these beliefs and practices. Social scientists who study culture define it both as material artifacts and nonmaterial ideas, attitudes, and beliefs. This concept stands in stark contrast to the historical definition of culture used in 18th and 19th century Europe, which associated it with civilization and contrasted it with nature or non-civilization. Sociologists define high culture as artistic entertainment and artifacts pursued by members of society with significant education or skill, often requiring years of formal study to appreciate or produce. By contrast, popular culture often appeals to the working classes; examples include sports, movies, TV soap operas, and rock music.
Sociologists typically divide culture into various categories such as ethnic, racial, gender and geographical. Sociologists then study how cultural interactions influence behavior and how this may change over time.
An essential principle of cultural theory is that people learn through social rather than genetic means. This social learning occurs via symbols and tools used for the classification of experience – including language itself – which is one of the most complex systems created by humans to classify experience. Different languages or underlying concepts may create difficulties when communicating health-related information – this point was highlighted by several Institute of Medicine reports and highlighted further in our section on health literacy; cultural considerations must, therefore, be taken into account when considering interventions that improve health outcomes.

What impact does culture have on graduate school success?

What impact does culture have on graduate school success?

What Are Your Core Beliefs?

Values are words that define the qualities and behaviors that you wish to exhibit and pursue in life. Think of values as being like a map that points you towards things you would like to accomplish or become.
Such traits represent global qualities of ongoing action; therefore, they must cover an array of patterns of behavior. If, for example, you wish to be known as a compassionate friend, this should include both your actions when with them (ongoing action), as well as how you interact with them throughout various situations (ongoing quality).
Your values may have come from either your family or yourself; perhaps even cultural or societal norms and beliefs have an effect.
Your values form the core of who you are. While people may tend to adopt the values of their culture as the “correct” way to behave, in ethical decision making, it is crucial to weigh your values against those of other cultures.

What Are Your Core Beliefs?

What Are Your Core Beliefs?

How Can Your Ethnic Heritage Elevate Your Graduate Experience?

Researchers and policymakers alike are taking an increasing interest in the occupational trajectories of highly educated descendants of labor migrants. These studies primarily investigate processes of marginalization and ethnic niche formation among low-status occupations; less is known about second-generation professionals at the uppermost levels of the labor market hierarchy. We conducted in-depth interviews with 62 descendants of labor migrants working in three prestigious professions in Norway: medicine, law, business, and finance. We identify processes of ethnic niche formation among these professionals both within mainstream firms and through ethnic entrepreneurship. However, these processes do not appear to reflect either blocked opportunities to enter mainstream firms or the strategic capitalization on ethnic resources; rather, they appear as unintended results of second-generation professionals’ professional competence.
Seven second-generation Pakistani lawyers that we interviewed had established small law firms catering exclusively to co-ethnic clients. This ethnic niche formation can be likened to immigrant enclaves (Model 1993; Waldinger 1994), although their location often lies lower in society.
Business professionals in our sample who utilize cultural competency to distinguish themselves do so on the basis of client or market needs, which contrasts with Konyali (2017), who found that business professionals of Turkish origin often try to leverage their ethnicity by creating professional profiles and networks around it. Perhaps our informants’ lack of attempts at building niches based on ethnicity could also be explained by blocked opportunities or subtle forms of discrimination at work.

How Can Your Ethnic Heritage Elevate Your Graduate Experience?

How Can Your Ethnic Heritage Elevate Your Graduate Experience?

How Can Religion Shape Your Graduate School Experience?

Religion is a cultural factor that plays an essential role in people’s everyday lives, according to research conducted by the Pew Research Center. A study showed that when individuals believe certain beliefs or behaviors are essential to their faith, they’re more likely to act on those things regularly than those who don’t hold this belief.
The study also discovered that those who identify as religious tend to be more involved with their families, more likely to volunteer, and more satisfied with life overall than those who don’t practice religion. However, it should be remembered that while religion influences culture, culture also shapes religion.
For example, if someone is very religious and encounters something that goes against their beliefs, they may go through five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. This shows just how powerful culture and religion can be even when they differ; religion will take cues from real life while real life takes cues from religion – both affect each other equally!

How Can Religion Shape Your Graduate School Experience?

How Can Religion Shape Your Graduate School Experience?

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