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Mastering Image Citations for a Professional Website

By Tom Seest

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Website Blog?

At WebsiteBloggers, we help website bloggers develop strategies to create content, traffic, and revenue from website blogs based on our experiences and experimentation.

If you are using images from a library-licensed database, be sure to refer back to its terms of use for any specific attribution requirements. Otherwise, follow APA standards of last name, first name, middle initial, image title in brackets, and source (usually website name/URL).
Citations for images can be more complex than text citations because they require additional information besides just the creator’s name and year of creation.

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Website Blog?

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Website Blog?

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Blog? APA Style Tips!

If you’re creating a blog for your website, it is crucial that every post contains accurate image citations in order to prevent copyright infringement and maintain a professional appearance. There are various styles of citation, such as MLA, APA, and Chicago. If you need assistance in using them correctly, there are online resources that offer assistance – for instance, Perdue University offers an excellent guide that covers these styles of citing sources.
When referencing images on a website blog, use the APA style of citation. This requires providing both a caption and reference list entry for every image, with the former including the author’s name and title. Moreover, reference list entries should include the author’s last name, publication date, and URL or DOI of the source material.
Some images on websites are freely available to anyone looking to use them, with search engines like Google Images offering these pictures for search and use. You can search these on sites such as Flickr, MorgueFile, FreeFoto, and Pixabay, which are examples of sites offering such free images. When using an image with an attribution license from an artist’s website, make sure you provide this credit when linking back; providing this info will also increase traffic and search engine visibility, boosting your SEO results and increasing sales/visibility/traffic.
If the image is clip art or stock photography without written permission for its use, you must include both an in-text citation and reference list entry for it. Furthermore, you may need to describe its content via figure notes. Furthermore, provide a caption in your paper, as well as including both an in-text citation and reference list entry if it forms part of a table.
If an image falls within the public domain or has no attribution requirements under the Creative Commons license, then no figure note or reference list entry should be created for it. If unsure, referring to the APA Style guide may help to establish whether this image should be included as part of a reference list entry or not.

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Blog? APA Style Tips!

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Blog? APA Style Tips!

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Blog Using MLA Style?

Whenever you use images on your website blog, it is imperative that you know how to cite them properly. Citing ensures you do not violate copyright laws and protects readers from legal action – particularly important when using photos and graphics not belonging to you. Grammarly offers an excellent tool that makes citing images effortless; just click here, and you will create perfect citations each and every time!
MLA-style citations of images typically follow the same format as any online source. Citations should include information such as the author’s last name and initial, image title in italics, website hosting the image (where applicable), date of publication (month day year), and URL; additionally, students are expected to include both publisher and creator in their reference list.
Citing images found online, students should use the following information when citing images:
The seventh edition of the MLA style guide recommends that students cite image titles in italics and list details about each image’s author, size, and publication date – such as month and year – along with details such as their museum or gallery showing locations of exhibition.
Students viewing images in person should cite the image description rather than its title; if an image does not have one, a short summary should suffice instead of using just file-type information. Furthermore, if part of a public collection (museum or gallery), students should include that as part of their citation instead.
Students citing images found online should link directly to the web page hosting it rather than providing its URL; this allows readers to quickly access it. Furthermore, some websites offer permalinks that offer shorter URL versions without using http:// or https://.

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Blog Using MLA Style?

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Blog Using MLA Style?

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Website Blog?

When including photos in blog posts, it’s essential that they’re correctly cited. Copyright laws are strict, and any oversight could result in a lawsuit or even reputation damage – so take some time learning how to cite images so that you’ll know you are following all rules without placing yourself or your readers at risk.
Chicago style of referencing is popularly employed by scholars and researchers. It utilizes footnotes and endnotes to structure citations and generate bibliographies at the end of your paper, unlike other styles, which rely solely on author-date citations for source identification.
Citing images using the Chicago style requires you to include information such as the creator and title of each image within your article. In addition, provide details on where you found them online (if not online, list the publisher name instead) as well as the publication date in your citations.
Citing images that appear in works of fiction or poetry should follow the same rules as when citing photographs from magazines or newspapers; you should include the author’s last name and first name, image title, date of publication, and medium in your citation.
Citing sheet music according to Chicago style requires listing its author’s last name and initials, the work’s title, its publisher, and any digital formats of this work, such as a URL for downloads.
Citing films or plays with multiple actors should include listing each actor alphabetically according to when they appeared in the film; if multiple directors exist for that film, mention each one separately as part of your citation; for video files with more than one format available (such as DVD), note this fact and list it all within your citation.

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Website Blog?

Are You Properly Citing Images on Your Website Blog?

Are You Citing Images Correctly? Tips for Harvard Style

Images play an integral role in any website, blog, or academic text, from helping to embellish a page to making ideas clearer for readers. Just as with any information source, images should always be properly referenced so as to avoid allegations of plagiarism or copyright infringement.
Citing images doesn’t need to be difficult. The basic requirements are similar to other sources (see the APA and MLA style guides for further assistance), with specific guidelines provided by digital image databases like this SFU guide as examples.
Citations of visual items in Harvard style typically follow this format: Author(s), Surname(s), First Initial(s), Year of Publication, Title in Italics of Visual Item with Additional Details If Needed, such as Photograph/Painting/Table/Chart, etc, as well as Source Information such as where an Image Can Be Found Often databases provide these details.
Some writers include charts as image files in their manuscripts; others prefer creating or copy-pasting from external sources. If this occurs, its original creator(s) should be acknowledged with an in-text citation and full reference list entry citing such sources, for instance (Newton 2007).
When using graphics created by someone else on your website blog, be sure to cite its creators in a similar manner as when citing an article or book. Doing this will not only prevent accusations of plagiarism but will also ensure you cite the most up-to-date version of a chart, thereby minimizing risks of copyright infringement.
It is also wise to remember that even free images from the Internet may still fall under copyright protection and should always be checked with their owner or consult your discipline’s citation style guide for guidance.

Are You Citing Images Correctly? Tips for Harvard Style

Are You Citing Images Correctly? Tips for Harvard Style

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